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Family Support Organization of Bergen County

Details

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Family Support Organization of Bergen County

Fair Lawn,

New Jersey, United States

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Address

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0-108 29th St, New Jersey, Fair Lawn, 07410

Services

  • FAMILY THERAPY

Language/Culture

  • English

Age Groups

  • Adolescents(13-18 yrs)
  • Adults(19-25 yrs)
  • Children(4-12 yrs)
  • Elderly(51-65 yrs)
  • Kids(0-3 yrs)
  • Middle Age(36-50 yrs)
  • Old(65+ yrs)
  • Youth(26-35 yrs)

Gallery

Contact

At the time of first European contact, Bergen County was inhabited by Native American people, particularly the Lenape Nation, whose sub-groups included the Tappan, Hackensack, and Rumachenanck (later called the Haverstraw), as named by the Dutch colonists.[16] Some of their descendants are included among the Ramapough Mountain Indians, recognized as a tribe by the state in 1980.[17] Their ancestors had moved into the mountains to escape encroachment by Dutch and English colonists. Their descendants reside mostly in the northwest of the county, in nearby Passaic County and in Rockland County, New York, tracing their Lenape ancestry to speakers of the Munsee language, one of three major dialects of their language.[18] Over the years, they absorbed other ethnicities by intermarriage.[19] In the 17th century, the Dutch considered the area comprising today's Bergen and Hudson counties as part of New Netherland, their colonial province of the Dutch Republic. The Dutch claimed it after Henry Hudson (sailing for the Dutch East India Company) explored Newark Bay and anchored his ship at Weehawken Cove in 1609.[20] From an early date, the Dutch began to import African slaves to fill their labor needs. Bergen County eventually was the largest slaveholding county in the state.[21] The African slaves were used for labor at the ports to support shipping, as well as for domestic servants, trades, and farm labor. Early settlement attempts by the Dutch included Pavonia (1633), Vriessendael (1640), and Achter Col (1642), but the Native Americans repelled these settlements in Kieft's War (1643–1645) and the Peach Tree War (1655–1660).[22][23] European settlers returned to the western shores of the Hudson River in the 1660 formation of Bergen Township, which would become the first permanent European settlement in the territory of present-day New Jersey.[24][25]

Fee

Free

Eligibility

A family-run, county-based nonprofit that provides education, advocacy, support groups, and workshops for families and caregivers.

Application Instructions

No Data

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